Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine & Molecular Diagnostics Embassy suites, Las Vegas, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Track 6: Nanotechnology
    Track 11: Cancer Immunology & Oncology
    Track 7: Therapeutic Vaccines
    Track 8: Translational Research in Personalized Medicine
Location: Tropicana-1, Embassy Suites Las Vegas
Speaker

Chair

Claudio Nicolini

University of Genova, Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

Anton Yuryev

Elsevier, USA

Session Introduction

Frank S. Ong

Illumina Inc., USA

Title: Next-generation sequencing in personalized medicine

Time : 09:55-10:15

Speaker
Biography:

Frank S Ong, MD is currently the Associate Director of Medical Affairs at Illumina, Inc. He graduated with honors from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. He completed a research fellowship in genetics of blood pressure regulation in the Division of Experimental Pathology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and a clinical fellowship in Clinical Molecular Genetics in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of UCLA. He has garnered numerous awards for his research in hypertension, including American Heart Association (AHA) Kidney Council New Investigator Award for High Blood Pressure Research and many more He has served as a peer reviewer for Hypertension, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, The Pharmacogenomics Journal, Pharmacogenetics and Genomics, and PLoS ONE. His interest in genetics and personalized medicine has led to active participation in several population genetics consortia, including NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), CHARGE, and MESA, focusing on the genetics of blood pressure regulation, personal genomics and pharmacogenetics.

Abstract:

The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has made sequencing not only rapid and cost-effective, but also highly accurate and reproducible. NGS can be applied to personalized medicine through whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to detect variations across the entire genome, whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify variants in the coding regions, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and targeted sequencing of specific gene panels and/or well-defined pathways. These advances have increased the utility of NGS in clinical settings, with applications ranging from the identification of rare diseases to the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in maternal-fetal medicine. Deep sequencing and circulating free tumor DNA in the oncology space is also trending toward clinical utility. As NGS becomes widely adopted, there are challenges to overcome, such as consensus on medically relevant genomic variants, burden on patients and clinicians of reporting, intervening, and follow-up of genomic findings, including incidental findings. Regulatory clearance of NGS-based platforms and approval of clinical assays utilizing NGS technologies, are also central to the continued implementation of NGS in personalized medicine.

Speaker
Biography:

Anton Yuryev received his Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University where he discovered proteins physically linking RNA polymerase II transcription and RNA processing in eukaryotic cells. At birth of Bioinformatics he began working on sequence and genotyping analysis as Senior Scientist at InforMax, continued at Orchid Bioscience as Senior Bioinformatics Analyst to optimize primer design, and then at Ariadne Genomics developing new approaches for pathway and network analysis. Dr. Yuryev has published over 40 scientific publications, edited 3 scientific books. He is now the Director of Professional services at Elsevier

Abstract:

We describe approach to infer pathways activated in tumors from individual gene expression profiling data of cancer patients. Tumor microarray expression data is imported into Pathway Studio software, normalized on normal tissue, and analyzed by sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) option Expression targets to identify major regulators up-stream of differentially expressed genes. We then compare regulators found by software with the collection of cancer-related pathways developed in Pathway Studio. This pathway collection is based on SNEA regulators identified in previously analyzed cancer patients. Our collection currently has 47 cancer-related pathways describing biological processes frequently activated during tumorogenesis: cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchimal transition, macrophage activation, and neutrophil infiltration. Pathways contain 3,674 proteins and are gradually improved by adding new SNEA regulators from new patients. More than 50% of expression profiles from new patients can be explained by existing pathway collection. We find that majority of advanced solid tumors are characterized by macrophage activation through apoptotic clearance, angiogenesis and EMT induced by hypoxia due to venous thrombosis. Our approach allows quick identification of key processes and regulators responsible for tumor growth in a given patient. We propose that major expression regulators identified by SNEA in patient tumor can be considered as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Information about drugs inhibiting SNEA regulators is readily available in Pathway Studio. With our cancer pathway collection Pathway Studio becomes one-stop knowledgebase for designing personalized drug treatment based on patient gene expression profile.

Luminita Castillos

Personalized Hematology-Oncology of Wake Forest, USA

Title: Gene expression profiling for targeted cancer treatment

Time : 10:35-10:55

Biography:

Luminita Castillos received a Ph.D in Physiology and an MBA degree for Kenan-Flager Business School Chapel-Hill North Carolina. She went on to complete three postdoctoral fellowships in cancer research using in-vitro and in-vivo studies, gene expression profiling, laser capture microscopy and more other molecular biology studies. She launched a unique independent oncology clinic in 2012 which translates gene expression profiling data into an actionable clinical practice based on a patient’s unique cancer.

Abstract:

In 2012 our independent oncology clinic opened the door with an innovative business model for an oncology practice: to identify the blue print of individual patients tumors by using gene expression profiling for clinical treatment. Each patient had volunteered to utilize this research tool, signed the consent formfor tissue procurement &processing, and all patients hadmetastatic stage IV disease. One patient had failed available NCCI and ASCO guideline protocols with progression of disease. Tumor biopsies (normal and tumor tissue) were preserved in RNA-later media from three different cancer patients (liver, breast and colon cancers). Gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array and data analysis was done by using Pathway Studio software from Elsevier. Doing subtraction analysis we identified the major signal transduction pathways for each type of cancers proliferation and treated each patient with specific drugs targeting their own tumors blueprint based on up- or down regulated genes from their individual profile. Currently, these individuals are still receiving treatment, but all three have already outlived Overall Survival estimates based on standard of care treatment. One patient has undergone repeat surgical resection&biopsy for further analysis of how her tumor has evolved under initial treatment to determine which specific combination of molecularly-targeted drugs are necessary to inhibit multiple signal transduction pathways in order to achieve apoptosis of her hepatocellular carcinoma cells for the next best option for treatment and continuing survival.

Break:
Coffee Break 10:55-11:15 @ Atrium

Jessica Foley, Giselle Sholler

Helen DeVos Childrens Hospital, USA

Title: Molecular-guided therapeutic trials in pediatric cancer

Time : 11:15-11:30

Speaker
Biography:

Giselle Sholler MD is currently the chair of the Neuroblasotma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (www.nmtrc.org). She is the Haworth Family Endowed director of Innovative Therapeutics Clinic and head of the Pediatric Oncology Translational Research Programin Pediatric Oncology at Helen DeVos Childrens Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI as well as associate professor in the college of Human Medicine at Michigan State University, Grand Rapids MI. She received her M.D. from New York Medical College, in Valhalla, NY. She was a resident in pediatrics and, subsequently, a fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology at Brown University, before coming to international prominence for her work with relapsed neuroblastoma at the University of Vermont. She then transferred her program to Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI. As Haworth Endowed Director of the Innovative Therapeutics Clinic she focuses on early phase clinical trials for pediatric cancers Her lab research at HDVCH is focused on neuroblastoma and identifying new therapies through preclinical development leading to Phase I clinical trials as well as genomic analysis of tumors for children. With the NMTRC, she opened the first FDA-approved personalized medicine clinical trial in pediatric oncology and has expanded this across 15 centers across the US.

Abstract:

A fundamental challenge in the area of targeted cancer treatment is how to identify optimal therapeutic combinations that can treat heterogeneous tumors that are both highly adaptive and that exhibit significant inter- and intra-patient variation. Our research program outlines an approach by which we can utilize our expanding knowledge of molecular networks and the mechanisms of action of a growing pharmacopeia to deliver targeted combinations of effective therapies to pediatric cancer patients. The primary objective of our studies have been to evaluate the feasibility and safety of using predictive modeling based on genome-wide mRNA expression profiles and DNA mutations of tumor biopsies to make real-time treatment decisions. Our initial study has shown that the total time from date of biopsy to tumor board was 6-11 days (95 CI: 7.5 – 10.2) and 7-20 days to treatment (95 CI: 8.9 – 16.1). The tumor board, which consisted of pediatric oncologists from 15 sites across the US, pharmacists, bioinformatians, pathologists, created individualized therapy regimens for all subjects. Tumors were grown in culture and in mice xenograftsfor validation studies of predicted drug sensitivity. This study has shown that it is feasible to obtain real-time genomic profiling for molecularly guided therapy for use in treatment decision making. All regimens were safe without any unexpected serious adverse events proving that the molecular tumor board is able to make safe decisions similar to hospital tumor boards making treatment decisions without molecular information on the patients. The program is expanding to include DNA exome and RNA sequencing analysis.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hadj Khodabakhshi has completed his Ph.D at the age of 31 years from Simon Fraser University in Canada. He has completed two postdoctoral studies in BC Cancer Research Centre and Canada’s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre. He held a scientist position at Canadas Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre and is currently a research investigator in Genomic Institute of Novartis Research Foundation. He is the author or co-author of more than 20 articles in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has significantly improved our understanding of many diseases and enhanced our ability to treat them. As NGS technologies advance, researchers are overwhelmed by the massive volume of genomic and transcriptomic sequence data generated. Unfortunately the existing computational infrastructures cannot keep up with the ever increasing data generation capacity of NGS. This shortage will become a greater challenge when the NGS data begin to be utilized in clinical and healthcare applications, i.e. personalize medicine. In the near future large clinical labs need to employ computational infrastructures that are capable of organizing and processing hundreds of NGS samples on daily basis. In this research we present our efforts in creating such infrastructure that includes a consortium of databases for organizing various genomic mutation types and a high throughput mutation analysis pipeline. The high throughput computational pipeline is currently developed to process the SNP and Indel variation types. It is capable of processing the entire variation set in our database (over 4 billion variations across more than 4000 sample) in a timely fashion with the goal of identifying recurrent mutational targets in various cancer genomes. This pipeline can also utilize the resources on a computational cluster to statistically validate mutations by processing raw data in a parallel way. We have successfully applied this pipeline to perform a comprehensive study of aberrant somatic hypermutation (aSHM) targets in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). This study led to the discovery of 32 novel targets of aSHM in DLBCL.

Kelvin K. Tsai

National Institute of Cancer Research, Taiwan

Title: Linking tissue microarchitectures to rationalized molecular diagnostics in glandular cancers

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Kelvin K. Tsai completed his M.D. from Taipei Medical University and his Ph.D. from Harvard University and postdoctoral studies from University of California, San Francisco. He is currently the associate investigator and attending physician at National Institute of Cancer Research, a NIH-equivalent research institute in Taiwan.He is the author of more than 20 papers in high-impactbasic and translationalresearch journals and several issued patents.

Abstract:

Disruption of tissue microarchitectures represents an early step of epithelial tumorigenesis and the degree of which has been widely used for the histopathological grading of glandular cancers.Molecular portraits of structural differentiation may identify key regulatory pathways and improve outcome prediction in human glandular cancers. To translate this concept to clinics and to facilitate patient-tailored cancer treatment decision, we performed comparative genomic analysis of glandular microarchitectures generated in a three-dimensional organotypic culture system which recapitulated the differentiated morphology and exocrine functions of human glandular epithelial tissues to identify differentiation- and microarchitecture-specific gene signatures.This knowledge-based and model-informed biomarker strategy allows us to develop a highly accurate and robust 6-gene molecular diagnosis which can reflect tumor differentiation and cancer stem cell activity, thereby enabling a rationalized classification and prognostic prediction of pancreatic cancer patients (Wang etal, Gastroenterology 2013; patent pending).Similarly, we developed a 6-gene microarchitecture-specific signature which can prognostically classify prostate cancer patients with a remarkable accuracy (up to 95%; Li etal, Am J Pathol 2013; patent pending). Thus, by exploiting the genomic program associated with glandular microarchitecture formation,wecan identify differentiation-specific molecular subtypes and related prognostic markers that significantly enhance prognostic prediction of human glandular cancers. This strategy is now being used to develop differentiation-specific biomarkers in other types of glandular cancers that have high pathogenetic significance and clinical utility.

Biography:

Caroline Diorio completed her PhD in Epidemiology at Laval University in 2005 and was a Postdoctoral fellow at McGill University in 2008. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Department of Social and Preventive Medicine at Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. Her research is dedicated to a personalized approach to breast cancer prevention and treatment. She has published several papers in various peer-reviewed journals

Abstract:

Among known or suspected breast cancer risk factors, only a few are modifiable. Therefore, the possibility of reducing breast cancer incidence through modifiable dietary behaviors is highly attractive. Increasing daily intake of omega-3 fatty acids could represent an easy, inexpensive and promising way for reducing the incidence of breast cancer. However, recent data indicate that the protective effect of dietary omega-3 fatty acids, aloneor in ratio with omega-6, on breast cancer risk may be limited to obese women. To further clarify these findings, we examined the association between omega-3 fatty acids and mammographic breast density, one of the strongest breast cancer risk indicators and a promising intermediate marker for this disease. In our population of postmenopausal women, higher daily intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, alone or in ratio to omega-6, was associated with lower mammographic breast density among women with high body mass index,but not among women with low body mass index. The strength of these association and interaction were stronger when body mass index was replaced by waist circumference. Such findings suggest that increased long-chain omega-3 fatty acids intake could be an efficient strategy for breast cancer prevention, particularly among postmenopausal obese women.

Sevtap Savas

Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

Title: Replication of associations of two polymorphisms with survival times in colorectal cancer

Time : 12:35-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Sevtap Savas obtained her PhD in Molecular Biology and Genetics in 1999 from the Bogazici University, Turkey. She trained as a post-doctoral fellow or research associate in Louisiana State University (USA), Mount Sinai Hospital Research Institute (Canada) and Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute (Canada). Since 2008 she has been an assistant professor at Discipline of Genetics, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). Her research program currently focuses on genetic prognostic studies in colorectal cancer using genetic, epidemiological, biostatistical and computational approaches and development of public databases. She serves as a reviewer, academic editor or editorial board member for several journals.

Abstract:

Identification of genetic markers (e.g. inherited genetic polymorphisms) that can predict the survival outcomes in cancer patients is a hot research topic. Published studies reported a number of genetic polymorphisms associated with disease outcomes in colorectal cancer. In this study, we aimed to replicate the associations of 103 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) in a cohort of colorectal cancer patients from Newfoundland (Savas et al. in preparation). Patient cohort consisted of 505 Caucasian and unrelated patients recruited to the Newfoundland Colorectal Cancer Registry (NFCCR). The genotype data for 103 polymorphisms (or their proxies) were previously obtained using the Illumina® Omni1-Quad platform. The appropriate genetic model for each SNP was estimated using a previously published approach (Savas et al. 2013). For OS and DFS, at least one genetic model was estimated for 63 and 79 polymorphisms, respectively. These polymorphisms were then investigated under their genetic models by univariate Cox regression method. Our results demonstrated that one polymorphism in OS analysis and two polymorphisms in DFS analysis were associated with the risk of outcomes at the significance level of p<0.005. When adjusted for other known prognostic factors, association of two polymorphisms with DFS remained significant. These SNPs are located in two genes; one coding for an immune system protein and another coding for an RNA helicase.

Biography:

Abstract:

The primary aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial immune response of the adult honeybee worker Apis mellifera jementica stimulated with Micrococcus luteus (ATCC 10240) bacteria or the immune elicitor, Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and comparing their antimicrobial activity aft er feeding bees on standardized dose of thymoquinone, the active ingredient of black seed oil Nigella sativa, for 72 hours, then bees were injected with LPS or M. luteus. Diff erent antimicrobial peptides elicited in worker hemolymph treated groups were evaluated in vitro by an agar well diff usion assay against Escherichia coli strain (ATCC 25922) as Gram negative bacteria, Micrococcus luteus as Gram positive bacteria. Th e adult crude hemolymph of worker bees Apis mellifera jementica were obtained from naturally mated queen colonies in the apiary of the Research Institute in King Saud University. They were collected from hives in May 2012. Th e age of bees was determined by colour labeling of 11-19 h old workers which were isolated of combs maintained in an incubator at 34°C. Workers of particular ages gathered into plastic tubes and divided into three groups, the first was left untreated (control), the second immunized by 0.5 μl of 20 ng LPS/10 μl of APS (Apis physiological saline, pH: 4.5) or 0.5 μl of 1.15×106 cells/ml M. luteus. The third group were first allowed to feed on 10% glucose solution (w/v) containing 0.3% of thymoquinone (W/v) for 72 hours, and then were injected with LPS or M. luteus. Results of solid agar inhibition zone assays revealed significant effects of antimicrobial peptides elicited in worker Apis mellifera jementica immunized with LPS against E. coli (ATCC 25922), the diameter of growth inhibition zone reached (18.0±0.00 mm) compared to control non stimulated group (13.33±0.667 mm). However, in LPS-injected, group post-fed on Thymoquinone, non significant increase was observed. Comparable results are detected towards M. luteus with inhibitory zone diameter of (20.667±0.66 mm), that continued the same increase in the Th ymoquinone fed group with a diameter of (24.7±0.42 mm) compared to the intact non injected group. Comparably worker bees challenged with the infectious dosage 1.1x106 cells/ml of M. luteus (ATCC10240), showed that significant inhibition zone diameters were detected towards E. coli (ATCC 25922) of (17±1.33) and also the inhibitory zone continued until the highest range of it appeared on feeding with Th ymoquinone as the diameter of (22.667±0.667 mm) was obtained. Th e current study also included the use of Flow Cytometry technique to determine the rate of Apis mellifera jementica worker hemocytes that are subjected to programmed cell death post injection with infectious dosage of 1.1x106 cells/ml M. luteus (ATCC 10240). Results showed a moderate increase in the rate of programmed cell death of hemocytes in comparison to control group (non- induced bees). Such findings are considered the groundwork in an initial step for future study of the programmed cell death gene. Further experiments are in progress to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a standardized thymoquinone dose stimulation on the worker bees to avoid the adverse effects of this enhancer on bees trade off and vitality.

Wei Xu

University of Toronto, Canada

Title: Recursive partitioning method on survival outcomes for personalized medicine

Time : 14:15-14:35

Speaker
Biography:

Wei Xu is a Principal Biostatistician at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, a Scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute, and a faculty at Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Dr. Xu’s research interests focus on clinical trial design and methodology, statistical genetics, and cancer translational research. He has been involved in various clinical studies and human genetic studies. As Principal-Investigator or co-Investigator on multiple research studies, he has been involved in study design, data administration, statistical modeling and analysis on different clinical research and human genetic studies. So far, he has been published over 150 peer-reviewed papers in high impact journals of statistics, bioinformatics, medical science, and human genetics.

Abstract:

Abstract Background: A general method to create adjusted recursive partitioning (tree-based) model on survival outcomes is developed. Prognostic survival trees have historically been used to automatically uncover complicated GxG and GxE interactions. However scientists often want to uncover this structure while adjusting for confounding factors that are not of direct interest. Interaction survival trees can automatically identify the best treatment choice for patients and are a promising model to enable personalized medicine, but simulations to assess their performance on the high dimensional data found in personalized medicine have not been conducted. Methods: We develop a general framework to adjust for confounding factors in prognostic and interaction survival trees. These factors are numerous in practice and can include age, gender, study site in a randomized multicenter clinical trial, and the principal components of ancestry difference to control for population stratification in genetic studies. Results: Extensive simulations show the performance of our methods under various true tree structures. Our methods are shown to be well controlled under the null with only a 1.4-8.4% chance to build a spurious tree when none should be made. Under the alternative, the power to build the correct tree is robust to the large dimensional covariate space found in personalized medicine, dropping less than 2% when going from 10 to 1,000 potential splits. We applied our adjusted interaction tree on a randomized clinical trial study on head and neck cancer patients. The novel method successfully identify subgroups of head and neck cancer patients that respond positively to having antioxidant vitamins added to their treatment regime. These subgroups are based on the patients genetic signature and are adjusted for population stratification. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that our adjusted survival tree method can create prognostic and interaction survival trees that are adjusted for confounders not of direct interest. We have also shown that our adjusted interaction survival trees

Amir Y shaik

University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA

Title: Role of microRNAs in atrial fibrillation

Time : 14:35-14:55

Biography:

Amir Y shaik, Assistant Professor , University of Massachusetts, Medical School, USA. His research interest include Genetics Genomics AF and Personalized Medicine.

Abstract:

Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered in the U.S. affecting 5.2 million Americans, and the growing burden of AF has profound health implications due to the association of AF with an increased risk of stroke, heart failure, and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs that have recently gained status as key determinants in gene expression regulation in cardiovascular development and disease. Few biomarkers exist to identify individuals at risk for AF or response to therapies such as ablation. We conducted the present study to investigate if plasma miRNAs with putative gene targets implicated in cardiac remodeling were associated with AF, and to examine whether or not expression of miRNAs changed after AF ablation. Methods: We prospectively recruited 211 participants (112 with AF; 99 without AF) presenting to the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. We quantified plasma levels of 86 miRNAs by high-throughput qRT-PCR at baseline in all participants and 1-month post-ablation in 47 participants with AF.We performed global mean normalization prior to analyses and used logistic regression to examine associations between plasma miRNAs and AF. Results: We observed that plasma levels of 21 miRNAs were associated with AF and 31 plasma miRNAs changed after ablation. Notably, miRs-21 and 150 were associated with AF and changed after ablation. Conclusion: Our results implicate several miRNAs known to be involved in cardiac development, conduction, and stress response in the pathogenesis of AF. We found that miRs-21-5p and 150-5p were associated with AF. Further investigations involving well-characterized, large samples from longitudinal studies with standardized miRNA assessment and evaluation for AF are required to validate the observed associations.

Break:
Coffee Break 15:55-16:15 @ Atrium
  • Symposium by Vincent Gallicchio on Metals
Location: Tropicana-1, Embassy Suites Las Vegas
Biography:

Dr Pranay Tanwar, Assistant Professor, Laboratory Oncology Unit, Dr.B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. His research interests include morphology, cytochemistry, cytogenetics and immunophenotyping

Abstract:

Summary: Th e diagnosis of acute leukemia is based on morphology, cytochemistry, cytogenetics and immunophenotyping. Primary screening antibodies panel is used with the objective of stratifying the lineage followed by extensive secondary antibodies panel to reach a conclusive diagnosis. In this study the diagnostic utility of primary screening antibodies panel has been evaluated retrospectively based on the fi nal immunophenotype. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic utility of fi ve-color primary screening antibodies panel used in fl owcytometric immunophenotyping of Acute Leukemia. Method and Material: A total of 292 diagnosed cases of Acute Leukemia from Jan 2013 to Aug 2014 were included in this study. All these cases were stratifi ed to lineages with primary screening antibodies panel comprising of cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase (MPO), cytoplasmic 79a (c79a), CD34, cytoplasmic CD3 (c3) and CD45.Once the lineage has been stratifi ed, then extensive secondary panel with more specific marker of myeloid, B-ALL and T-ALL were used to reach the final diagnosis. Results: Of all the cases (292) evaluated 235(81%) were sucessfully identifi ed on primary screening panel only , 57(19%) cases failed to show any specific lineage in primary screening panel. These 57 cases included 31/125(25%) AML, 22/131(17%) B-ALL and 4/36(11%) cases of T-ALL. Conclusion: Th e five-color primary screening antibodies panel is proved useful in identify the correct lineage in 81% of cases. Th e absence of lineage specific marker was the most common reason for failure of the predictive power of the primary panel.

Guo-Hui Fu

Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Title: Gastric cancer therapy by targeting erythroid proteins
Speaker
Biography:

Guo-Hui Fu has completed her MD at the age of 20 from Jiamusi Medical College, China and then completed PhD from Harbin Medical University, China and postdoctoral studies from Kyushu University school of Medicine, Japan. She is the Dean and Professor of Pathology Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine. She has published more than 81 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Epidemiological studies have shown that gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and remains the second most common cause of cancer related death in the world. Due to limitations of the surgery treatment and chemotherapeutic regimens on the overall survival in patients with GC, more and more patients are resorting to molecular diagnosis and biological treatment. Our group revealed that hematopoietic stem cells can be planted in the gastric mucosa and then diff erentiated into gastric epithelial cells via suppressing innate erythroid proteins and simultaneously inducing the de novo expression of epithelial proteins. Erythroid protein such as band 3 was normally silenced at the protein level at gastric mucosa but was induced under the precancer condition such as HP infection or chronic atrophic gastritis, indicating the expression of erythroid proteins is a key event during the malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells at gastric mucosa. We also demonstrated that the expression of erythroid proteins is closely correlated with human GC progression by interrupting the cell cycle regulation and inhibiting the gastric acid secretion. Therefore, the erythroid proteins are the molecular markers for GC diagnosis especially for the poorly-differentiated type of GC. Our group further revealed that gastrin treatment lessened the malignancy of poorly differentiated GC cells by suppressing erythroid protein expression, promoting acid secretion and inactivating Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In addition, co-treatment of gastrin and trastuzumab (HER2-targeted drug for GC) synergistically inhibited the HER2-negative cells. Th e results provided new markers for GC diagnosis and broaden the therapeutic range of trastuzumabin GC.

Biography:

Subhanu Roy Chowdhury is presently working as Assistant professor in University of Burdwan, India. His research interests include musculoskeletal disorders, Physiology and Personalized Medicine.

Abstract:

Work related musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of pain in Jute Mill workers in Jute Mills involved in batching, weaving and stacking process. Th is study aimed to categorize the component of neuropathic and/or nociceptive pain with reference to chronic low back pain, its probable causes and its impact on functional variables like hand grip strength, number of man days lost etc. Male subjects [n=670] in the age range of 25-45 years from diff erent brick fi elds of Hooghly and North 24 Parganas of West Bengal, India with a work experience of more than 10 years participated in this study. Our results indicated pain/discomfort was mainly at the low back (45%), neck (33%) and wrist (12%). 14% of workers had a pain of >20 in the pain scale of the pain detect tool & 17% of workers were not satisfi ed with treatments with analgesics/antipyretics which indicate the involvement of neuropathic component of pain in them. Th e impact of pain was revealed on functional & productivity endpoints like reduced grip strength which also lead to absenteeism, loss of average man days [2.5/month], injuries [13% of workers] and monotony [65% workers]. Th e probable cause of the chronic low back pain may be due to radiculopathy from repetitive lift ing of bricks over and above the Recommended Weight Limit