Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine & Molecular Diagnostics Embassy suites, Las Vegas, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Track 9: Pain & Emergency Medicine
    Track 10:Lifestyle Medicine
Location: Tropicana-1, Embassy Suites Las Vegas
Speaker

Chair

Sergey Suchkov

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Russia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Trevor G Marshall

Autoimmunity Research Foundation, USA

Session Introduction

Abdel Kareem Azab

Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, USA

Title: 3D-tissue engineered bone marrow as predictive tool for personalized therapy in multiple myeloma

Time : 12:55-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Abdel Kareem Azab completed his pharmacy studies, MSc in medicinal chemistry, and PhD in drug-delivery systems and biomedical-implants at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He joined Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/ Harvard Medical School for his post doctoral training focusing on the biological role of tumor microenvironment in progression, metastasis, and drug resistance in hematologic malignancies. He leads his laboratory for Multi-Disciplinary, Translational Research to Beat Cancer at Washington University of Saint Louis. He published more than 55 publications and 6 patents; he is on the editorial board of several scientific journals, and collaborates with leading academic laboratories and pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract:

Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and represents approximately 20% of deaths from hematological malignancies. Despite the success of numerous contemporary therapies to eradicate MM in vitro and in animal models, more than 90% of MM patients develop resistance to therapy and relapse. The discrepancy between drug efficacy in laboratory settings and the dissatisfactory clinical outcomes can be attributed to limitations of the classic drug development models, including the neglect of the interaction of tumor cells with other components of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment; lack of tri-dimensional (3D) aspects of the BM niche (hypoxia and drug-gradient); and relying on a limited number of cell lines and do not reflect the enormous heterogeneity between individual patients. In our study, we produced a 3D-tissue engineered in vitro model of BM (3DTEBM) in MM, including MM cells, stromal cells, endothelial cells and extracellular matrix. All cells used for one 3DTEBM are isolated from a BM aspirate from individual MM patient. The 3D scaffold to accommodate the cells was produced by biological cross-linking of the BM supernatant of the same individual MM patient. We found that, in the 3DTEBM, MM cells proliferated more and showed significantly more drug resistance compared to classic tissue cultures. This 3DTEBM is currently investigated to predict the drug-response in MM patients, in which, we develop 3DTEBM for individual patients to test their response to therapy in vitro and correlate our findings with clinical response; to develop personalized therapeutic strategies for each individual MM patients.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:15-14:15 @ Atrium
  • Workshop by Sergey Suchkov
Location: Tropicana-1, Embassy Suites Las Vegas
Speaker

Chair

Sergey Suchkov

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Russia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Trevor G Marshall

Autoimmunity Research Foundation, USA

Session Introduction

Trevor Marshall

Autoimmunity Research Foundation, USA

Title: Autoimmune inflammation and the human microbiome

Time : 10:20-10:40

Speaker
Biography:

Trevor G Marshall graduated from the University of Adelaide, South Australia, in 1974. His Doctoral thesis, ‘Insulin metabolism in Diabetes,’ was accepted by the University of Western Australia in 1985. He taught at the Institute of Technology in Lae, Papua New Guinea, Curtin University and the University of Western Australia, before moving to California in 1982. He is currently Director of the Autoimmunity Research Foundation in California. Research in the 1980’s led to successful therapies for cryptorchidism, male and female infertility, and diabetes, but he is best known for his recent discoveries in translational Metagenomics and Autoimmune disease. He has won US FDA designations for minocycline and clindamycin in the treatment of sarcoidosis, and is currently steering the new generic drug ‘Pure Olmesartan’ through FDA review. He is a Fellow of the European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine (Brussels) and a member of the International Expert Council, Community of Practice: Preventative Medicine (Moscow).

Abstract:

We all possess autoantibodies, even in the absence of disease. The ELI-Viscero panel, for example, measures 24 autoantibodies which are part of a normal healthy human body, often called “natural” autoantibodies. It appears that their proper homeostasis is essential to maintenance of a healthy body, assisting the immune system to deal with apoptotic cells and dead tissue. Elevated titres of natural autoantibodies can often be the earliest sign of incipient development of a latent disease process. Historically attributed to “Horror Autotoxicus,” it is now considered more likely that these antibodies are produced against components of the human microbiome. Antibody poly-specificity causes some of them to become autoantibodies, with a definable autoimmune target. The inflammation generated by this process often leads, over time, to a diagnosis of chronic disease, or to an inflammatory cancer.

Break:
Coffee Break 10:40-11:00 @ Atrium

Trevor G Marshall

Autoimmunity Research Foundation, USA

Title: Microbiome-induced proteome dysbiosis in autoimmune disease

Time : 11:00-11:20

Speaker
Biography:

Trevor G Marshall graduated from the University of Adelaide, South Australia, in 1974. His Doctoral thesis, ‘Insulin metabolism in Diabetes,’ was accepted by the University of Western Australia in 1985. He taught at the Institute of Technology in Lae, Papua New Guinea, Curtin University and the University of Western Australia, before moving to California in 1982. He is currently Director of the Autoimmunity Research Foundation in California. Research in the 1980’s led to successful therapies for cryptorchidism, male and female infertility, and diabetes, but he is best known for his recent discoveries in translational Metagenomics and Autoimmune disease. He has won US FDA designations for minocycline and clindamycin in the treatment of sarcoidosis, and is currently steering the new generic drug ‘Pure Olmesartan’ through FDA review. He is a Fellow of the European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine (Brussels) and a member of the International Expert Council, Community of Practice: Preventative Medicine (Moscow).

Abstract:

Even though chronic inflammatory disease often comprises 70% of a nation\'s health budget, its molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Without a clear pathogenic description, the available treatments for Autoimmune, Neurologic, and even Psychiatric diagnoses, have remained marginally effective, and Preventative and Predictive Medicine has been stalled at the starting-gate. With Metagenomics came the understanding that man is a super-organism, a community of thousands of species of microbes functioning in homeostasis with the human genome. Proteomics and Metabolomics have built on this foundation with the knowledge that even seemingly similar diseases result from not a single transcriptional dysfunction, but from thousands of dysfunctional interactions between the host and its microbiome (the ‘Interactome’). Molecular mimicry exists on a scale which was inconceivable just 5 years ago. Fortunately, the retargeting of an approved drug has allowed quick Translation of immunostimulative, rather than immunosuppressive therapies, resulting in a clinical paradigm shift, and improved opportunities for rapid molecular discovery.

Biography:

Kirill Shlyapnikov, MD, Neurologist, Clinical Immunologist, obtained neurology specialization at Moscow State Medical-Stomatological University (MSMSU) and then immunology specialization at Peoples Friendship University of Russia (PFUR). Research activities cover clinical aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, autoimmune diseases of the nervous system and neuroinfections. He is Founder and Director of a private clinic Echinacea in Moscow.

Abstract:

Сurrently there is no clear understanding of the CFS and FM pathogenesis, therefore there are no clear criteria and their biomarkers. Due to the lack of objective criteria, CFS and FM have not been recognized as nosology for a long time. In the course of clinical research and observation of this group of patients we have found a number of patterns. For assessment by the severity scale and the choice of therapy, we have developed and use integrated biomarker of CFS/FM severity. Here we used our experience, the psychometric testing data and treatment terms and results statistics. In particular, we use 4 main biomarkers of CFS and FM: Compliance of the clinical presentation to the conventional CFS and FM criteria, REM sleep deficiency, increase of percentage of CD19, CD5 cells to the total CD19 population, producing the herpes group viruses DNA (HSV, EBV, CMV, HHV6) with saliva and urine, PCR or serological evidence of infection with chlamydia, mycoplasma, viral hepatitis B, C, D, G, TT, borrellia, yersinia, beta- hemolytic streptococcus of group A. We have created and used “three in one” method of prevention and treating CFS and fibromyalgia. Method shows the possibility of successful prevention of fibromyalgia in predisposed persons. Stage-by-stage control of the treatment efficiency shows a steady decline or absence of pain syndrome, and positive dynamics by the scale of integrated biomarker of CFS/MF severity. In 38% of cases we can talk about clinical recovery in 6 months.

Speaker
Biography:

Afaf El-Ansary has completed her Ph.D at the age of 37 years from Ain Shams University-Egypt and postdoctoral studies from National Research Centre. She is a professor in Biochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University. She has published more than 85 papers in high impact factor journals and serving as a reviewer and as an editorial board member

Abstract:

Fatty acids are essential dietary nutrients, and one of their important roles is providing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) for growth and function of nervous tissue. Short chain fatty acids SCFAs represent a group of compounds derived from the host microbiome that are recently known to induce many effects on gut, brain, and behavior and thus can be linked to neurodevelopmental disorders like autism. Reduced levels of PUFA are associated with impairments in cognitive and behavioral performance, effects which are particularly important during brain development. Recent studies suggest that omega -3 fatty acids as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) functions in neurogenesis, neurotransmission, and protection against oxidative stress. Omega-3 PUFAs mediate some of these effects by antagonizing Omega-6 PUFA (arachidonic acid, ARA) - induced pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) formation. In this work, absolute and relative concentrations of propionic (PPA), butyric and acetic acids together with PUFA and their precursors (α-Linolenic and linoleic), were measured in brain tissues of PPA- neurointoxicated rat pups (Recieved 250 mg PPA/Kg body weight for 3 consecutive days) as rodent model with persistent autistic features compared to healthy controls. The obtained data recorded remarkably lower levels of omega6/omega3, α-Linolenic/Linoleic, α-Linolenic/EPA, α-Linolenic/DHA, EPA / DHA, and ARA/Linoleic in PPA-intoxicated rats. Role of these impaired ratios was discussed in relation to the activity of desaturases and elongases as two enzymatic groups involved in the synthesis of PUFA from their corresponding precursors. The relationship between the abnormal relative concentrations of the studied fatty acids and oxidative stress, neurotransmission, and neuroinflammation was also discussed in details. Conclusion: This study proved that fatty acids ratios is useful for the rational understanding of the mechanism of PPA neurotoxicity in rodent model of autism and hence a possibility to use these ratios for predictive implications among patients with this disorder. Additionally, nutritional supplementation of depleted omega-3 fatty acids could be suggested as treatment strategy.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:00-14:00 @ Atrium